March 24, 2011

Come To My New Blog And Web Site!

I have a new blog and web site, and I'm inviting everyone to it. This blog/web site focuses on my erotic writing. I will continue to post sex toys reviews on this blog. So, if you want to keep up with me, visit me at my new digs.

Elizabeth Black - Blog and Web site

See you there!

Lizzie

Posted on March 24, 2011 at 12:28 PM | Permalink | Comments (10) | TrackBack

November 15, 2010

My Ms. Mag Article: Huffington Post Censor's Mother's Rights Activists

Huffington Post Censors Mothers' Rights Activists
November 11, 2010 by Elizabeth Black

This week, Arianna Huffington announced the Huffington Post's latest section: HuffPost Divorce. Her plug: "Breaking up is hard to do - but reading about it isn’t." Upon Monday's launch, however, there appeared a column that women's rights advocates took very hard: a piece by Dr. Richard Warshak promoting the discredited "Parental Alienation Syndrome," or PAS.

Parental alienation is a dangerous custody-battle concept that has been used primarily against mothers – and in particular, mothers trying to protect themselves and their children from hostile or abusive ex-partners and fathers. As R. Dianne Bartlow explained in her Summer 2010 Ms. article, “There’s Nothing Friendly About Abuse”:

PAS theorizes that most accusations of child abuse (especially sexual abuse) made during a custody battle are actually fraudulent. Not only are the charges false, says the theory, but they are deliberately undertaken by one parent (in most cases, the mother) to “alienate” the child from the other parent (generally, the father).

Frighteningly, PAS has allowed abusive or otherwise hostile fathers to gain custody of their children and then forbid the children contact with their mothers.

Yet parental alienation is not accepted as a valid theory by the American Psychological Association, and was rejected from the DSM-V. Without a real psychological definition, it has devolved over the years into a label for any negative testimony about the father by the mother (even if it’s true). It’s also now promoted as gender-neutral, but the parent most often labeled the "alienator" remains the mother. It's also one hell of a cash cow for psychologists who make a living from it.

In keeping with all this, Warshak’s post, "Stop Divorce Poison", gives an overly simplified description of "alienation" that could describe nearly any hostile or cantankerous relationship: "persistent bad-mouthing, lies, exaggerations, overlooking positives, and drum-beating negatives."

A half dozen domestic violence and motherhood activists, including myself, descended upon Warshak’s column to leave comments describing how discredited PAS really is. But, as I witnessed and others report, by the evening of November 9, most of the comments (nearly a dozen) posted by critics had been deleted in the space of five minutes. According to those I've spoken with, deleted comments contained valid source material from professional organizations citing:

* how discredited parental alienation really is

* how parental alienation did not make it into the DSM-V

* how it is used primarily as a weapon by abusive fathers against protective mothers

Here is an example of a comment that was removed:

Another activist and I wrote to David Flumenbaum and Arianna Huffington to inform them about the censorship of opposing, critical views. Both of us received an email in return from Social News Editor Adam Clark Estes, who wrote:

I've double-checked the comments and all of those missing were removed in accordance with HuffPost's commenting guidelines. You can read more about those here:

www.huffingtonpost.com/p/frequently-asked-question.html#moderation

That said, we're in touch with Dr. Warshak about his comments and will do our best to keep the conversation flowing in the future.

When considering the above screenshots (pure facts devoid of non-objective commentary) it's unclear which part of these guidelines apply:

(I) The Huffington Post welcomes all users to join our community and to comment and treats all members of the community equally.

(II) We want the Huffington Post to be home to open, transparent conversations in which people connect, discuss, share ideas, and debate the issues.

(III) We are also committed to maintaining a non-toxic atmosphere.

(IV) In order to preserve a functional and civil conversation, we do not allow trolls, trollish behavior, or stalking.

(V) Members of the HuffPost community deserve to be free from spam, and we do not allow posting the same comment multiple times within one thread or on multiple threads.

It's frustrating that the supposedly progressive HuffPost has given a platform to Dr. Richard Warshak, one of parental alienation’s most fervent supporters, but won’t give the same platform to its commenters. We are the pioneers in providing 650-296 and itil v3 certification tutorials with 100% exam pass guarantee. Download our latest pass4sure 70-271 & JN0-332 questions to pass real exam of testking 640-816 in time.

On November 10, activists returned to the article to comment; it remains to be seen if their comments will be deleted–or whether they’ll fall victim to HuffPost-moderation's thin skin. If a blog can delete comments opposing their viewpoint, then what's the point of comments? You might as well change the name to “compliments.”

Posted on November 15, 2010 at 09:05 AM | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack

March 08, 2010

Read My Posts At The New Ms. Magazine Blog

I am on the team of the new Ms. Magazine blog, where I write about sexuality and anything else that strikes my fancy. I haven't written anything outright feminist in a very long time, so it's good to be on board. I will certainly be an unusual voice, considering my history as a motherhood/family law activist and my current work as a sex writer and erotica/erotic romance author. My first blog post is a repost about my Alternet article about how we need to get over the G-spot. Here's the link:

Getting Over The G-spot

My second post, which is not up yet, is about the book "Ultimate Curves", erotic fiction about big, beautiful women. My short story "The Beautiful Move In Curves" appears in that book.

Coming soon: a satirical article about "Steak And B.J. Day", the men's answer to Valentine's Day. It also happens to be on my birthday. I'm going to have fun with that one.

Here's the press release for the new Ms. Magazine blog.

Ms. Magazine Launches the New Ms. Blog

On this International Women's Day, March 8th, Ms. magazine - the flagship feminist publication - launches the Ms. Blog, showcasing the sharp writing and informed opinions of a community of feminist bloggers from around the nation and the globe.

The Ms. Blog will be a hub for exchange, collaboration and discussion, introducing fresh perspectives on national and global politics, culture, media, health, law and life.

The range, diversity and quality of bloggers is already exceptional: In the months leading up to this historic launch, Ms. was inundated with blogging offers from academics, activists and journalists. There are contributors from seven countries and counting, and the overall contributors' roster ranges from well-known names to up-and-coming writers and thinkers. We at Ms. are thrilled about the prospects of intercultural and intergenerational exchange.

Among the bloggers who have signed on to this exciting new project are novelist Diana Abu-Jaber, sexuality author Hanne Blank, L.A. journalist and scholar Lynell George, health activist/author Paula Kamen, masculinity critic/scholar Michael Kimmel, environmental journalist Sonia Shah, feminist writer Deborah Siegel, sociologist Shira Tarrant, media scholar Ebony Utley, memoirist Aimee Liu, Chicana activist and "mommyblogger" Veronica Arreola, Moroccan feminist scholar Fatima Sadiqi, gender and global development expert Lina Abirafeh (reporting from Haiti), Iraqi activist Yanar Mohammed, Muslim feminist Melody Moezzi, Chicana author Michele Serros and law professor Pamela Bridgewater.

Recognizing that no aspect of life is immune from gender politics, the Ms. Blog will address the intersectionality of gender with race, class, nationality and sexuality. And although there will be personal talk on the Ms. Blog, it will always be with the recognition that the personal is political.

Ms. executive editor Katherine Spillar is available for interviews about the new Ms. blog.

Posted on March 8, 2010 at 01:21 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack